Russia a worldwide power, confident and powerful . That’s the image projected by President Putin . Decades after the Soviet Union’s collapse, Putin is counting on Russian traditions and values from the tsarist past to kindle patriotism.

Summary

Russian President Putin projects a picture of strength and unflappability on the worldwide stage. It is a projection that has infected the arrogance and ambitions of the many of his people. this is often particularly the case with the country’s […]

Russia a worldwide power, confident and powerful . That’s the image projected by President Putin . Decades after the Soviet Union’s collapse, Putin is counting on Russian traditions and values from the tsarist past to kindle patriotism.
Russia a worldwide power, confident and powerful . That’s the image projected by President Putin . Decades after the Soviet Union’s collapse, Putin is counting on Russian traditions and values from the tsarist past to kindle patriotism.

Russian President Putin projects a picture of strength and unflappability on the worldwide stage.

It is a projection that has infected the arrogance and ambitions of the many of his people. this is often particularly the case with the country’s religious communities, most notably the Cossacks, an ultra-conservative faith-based group that dates back to the 15th Century.

Putin’s Pride: Cossacks and therefore the Church examines the rising influence of this religious group in Russia, and the way their embrace of the president is proving interdependent .

The Cossacks were essentially banned during the reign of the Soviet Union . But many previously outlawed traditions have made a comeback in modern-day Russia, including the Orthodox Church. Today, these organizations are viewed as essential components to instilling a robust sense of pride, patriotism and loyalty to the president.

The Cossacks are now one among Putin’s most ardent and valuable constituencies.

Tradition brings a way of comfort, stability and normalcy, especially within the aftermath of tremendous conflict and violence.

Among a string of daily military-style drills, government funded Cossack schools teach these old traditions on a day to day and encourage the scholars to seem upon their president with great reverence.

The elites view the economy as strong and have enduring faith in their leader. Putin frequently lures them with incentives for his or her continued support, including his construction or restoration of over thousand Cossack churches per annum for the past decade.

The film contends that Putin is cognizant of the worth of this support and has positioned himself because the great champion of the orthodoxy. Conversely, these ultra-conservative groups enjoy a dominant voice in their government.

They actively step in to support police efforts to squash public protests. They work to suppress political candidates who dare to oppose Putin’s policies. They fancy the journalism to ostracize homosexuality as a sin. One popular television host even offered free plane tickets to the U.S. for the homosexual populations in Russia.

They’ve also made strides in terminating public educators who might harbor more liberal views.

Putin’s pride: Cossacks and the church | DW Documentary

Putin’s Pride: Cossacks and therefore the Church is an instructive portrait of the support systems that help the Russian president maintain such an iron grip over the hearts and minds of his countrymen.

Directed by: Sébastien Bardos, Guillaume Dumant

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